Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEllis, James Brianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:30:41Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:30:41Z
dc.date.issued2005-01-21en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-03042005-172430en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/41386
dc.description.abstractChlorinated solvents are among the most prevalent contaminants at Superfund sites. Perchloroethylene (PCE) and its degradative byproducts pose a particular problem because of their persistence in the subsurface and their threat to ecological health. In this study, microcosms were used to test the viability of bioaugmentation as a possible remediation strategy at a PCE contaminated site at the Naval Amphibious Base at Little Creek located in Virginia Beach, Virginia. All microcosms were created in duplicate using spatially diverse soils and the bioaugmented series innoculated with a mixed microbial culture provided by the Dr. Frank Loffler. This culture has been found to be capable of completely degrading PCE to ethene. The aqueous ethene concentration was monitored over time. It is clear from the results that bioaugmentation successfully increased the degree of reductive dechlorination over their static counterpart. Without innoculation, shallow static microcosms showed an accumulation of cis-DCE, while deep soils never showed conversion beyond TCE. Shallow bioaugmented microcosms showed the production and loss of vinyl chloride indicated probable complete conversion of PCE to ethene while deep soils showed the production of cis-DCE. These differences in dechlorination between shallow and deep soils indicate a possible disparity in reduction capacity. At day 78, microcosms were spiked with higher concentrations of PCE resulting in a reduction in dechlorination activity. Static microcosms exhibited similar degradative trends but bioaugmented batches experienced dramatic reductions in dechlorination activity indicating possible inhibition effects of native organisms due to concentration or potential toxic shock. It appears that bioaugmentation is a remediation alternative worthy of further study including possible delivery methods, toxicity or inhibition effects of concentration, and fate/transport studies.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartEllis_Thesis_Final.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectTetrachloroethyleneen_US
dc.subjectPCEen_US
dc.subjectTCEen_US
dc.subjectchlorinated solventsen_US
dc.subjectbioaugmentationen_US
dc.titleThe Feasibility of Bioaugmentation for the Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents: A Microcosm Studyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLove, Nancy C.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-03042005-172430/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairWiddowson, Mark A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairNovak, John T.en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-03-04en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-04-06
dc.date.adate2005-04-06en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record