Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStine, Melanie Brookeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-08en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:36:10Z
dc.date.available2009-06-08en_US
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:36:10Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2009-05-14en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05142009-225117en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/42654
dc.description.abstractThis study analyzes tree, soil, and microtopographic patterns present within the Cranberry Glades, a bog wetland complex located in the mountains of West Virginia. The Cranberry Glades are comprised of four open bog meadows, which provide unique habitat to several rare and endangered plant species. However, these meadows are filling in with trees and alder. This research is a study on the factors that may be involved in the processes and patterns influencing tree encroachment into the bog meadows across the open meadow â bog forest ecotone. To determine the patterns of infilling and the potential relationships among the trees, microtopography, and soil conditions, I collected and analyzed data on each of these factors within nine belt transects located across the ecotone. I gathered tree data on the following: location within transect, species, diameter at breast height or diameter at ground level, height class, associated microtopography, and growing conditions on 1,389 trees. Soil samples were gathered across the ecotone and analyzed for percent moisture, pH, and various nutrients and metals. I assessed historical aerial photographs to gain a temporal history on the patterns of infilling. The results indicate that trees decrease in density across the ecotone towards the peatland interior, and that trees are likely to be growing on hummock features and within tree islands. Soil properties resulted in mixed conclusions. The aerial photograph assessment revealed that trees and alders have been steadily encroaching into the open peatlands for at least the past 52 years. The finding of this research lend to increased knowledge on southern peatlands, wetland succession, and the Cranberry Glades Botanical Area.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartmbs_thesis_final.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectSouthern peatlandsen_US
dc.subjecttree infillingen_US
dc.subjectCranberry Gladesen_US
dc.subjectbiogeographyen_US
dc.titleVegetation and Soil Patterns at a Mountain Wetland Ecotoneen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairResler, Lynn M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCampbell, James B. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaniels, Walter Leeen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05142009-225117/en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record