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dc.contributor.authorPace, Gerald Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:36:19Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:36:19Z
dc.date.issued1999-05-04en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-051799-233440en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/42705
dc.description.abstractThe establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) through the signing of the Rome Statute in July, 1998 created the first permanent criminal court under international law. The Court stands in stark contrast to previous international criminal tribunals not simply because of its permanent nature, but also because it places the individual, not states, responsible under international law. It is, however, this independent, permanent nature of the Court which sparked fears within the society of states that the Court may in some manner serve to erode the state sovereignty. The purpose of this work is to address this basic concern. The aim of the work is to address the concept of sovereignty by first examining standard perceptions of sovereignty and then to move the discussion into an institutionalist construction of the term. Once accomplished, I then apply a set of criteria for evaluating sovereignty to the basic structures of the ICC in order to explore what the potential impact of the ICC may be on the institution of state sovereignty. In the end, I find that the institution of sovereignty is not threatened by the presence of the Court. In fact, the institution of sovereignty may be in some ways bolstered by the Court in that the Court embodies a new set of principals with regards to the appropriate relationship between the state and the individual.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartetdthesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectHuman Rightsen_US
dc.subjectInstitutionalen_US
dc.subjectInternational Criminal Courten_US
dc.subjectSovereigntyen_US
dc.titleSovereign Misconceptions: A Theoretical Analysis of the Perceived Impact of the International Criminal Court on the Institution of State Sovereigntyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairWeisband, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHult, Karen M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Charles Lewisen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-051799-233440/en_US
dc.date.sdate1999-05-17en_US
dc.date.rdate2000-05-27
dc.date.adate1999-05-27en_US


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