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dc.contributor.authorBeeman, Stephanie Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:36:22Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:36:22Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-04en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05182011-161005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/42722
dc.description.abstractNearly 27,000 vehicle occupants are killed annually in the United States, with passenger car and light truck occupants amassing 25,000 of these. Over 50% of passenger car and light truck occupant fatalities are due to frontal crashes. Although advancements in safety technology have reduced the number of fatalities and injuries, motor vehicle collisions are still a major issue in the United States. Continued development of computational models and biofidelic anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) necessitates benchmarking of current surrogates and further analysis of an occupantâ s biomechanical response in automobile collisions. This thesis presents data from low-speed frontal sled tests performed with human volunteers, a Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD, and post mortem human surrogates (PMHSs). The first study sought to investigate the effects of muscle bracing by human volunteers. The second study sought to compare the responses of the relaxed and braced volunteers in the first study to those of the Hybrid III and PMHS subjects. Overall, these two studies provide novel biomechanical data that can be used to refine and validate computational models and ATDs used to assess injury risk in automotive collisions. The third study was focused on quantifying the ability for children to swing a sword-like toy. Over 200,000 toy-related injuries occur every year in the United States. Currently, data is unavailable with regard to sword-like toys. Incorporating the knowledge gained by this study will allow manufacturers to reduce the inherent risks associated with their products as well as market them to the correct target age groups.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartBeeman_SM_T_2011.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectVolunteersen_US
dc.subjectForward Excursionsen_US
dc.subjectKinematicsen_US
dc.subjectPediatricen_US
dc.subjectToy Swordsen_US
dc.subjectPMHSen_US
dc.subjectATDen_US
dc.subjectMuscle Bracingen_US
dc.titleQuantifying the Kinematics of Injury Biomechanics: Several Applications Incorporating Human Volunteers and Surrogatesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairDuma, Stefan M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMadigan, Michael L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKemper, Andrew R.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05182011-161005/en_US
dc.date.sdate2011-05-18en_US
dc.date.rdate2011-05-31
dc.date.adate2011-05-31en_US


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