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dc.contributor.authorKwong, Gordon Houngen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:36:29Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:36:29Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-05en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05192010-094755en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/42753
dc.description.abstractFull-motion driving simulators require efficient real-time high fidelity vehicle models in order to provide a more realistic vehicle response. Typically, multi-body models are used to represent the vehicle dynamics, but these have the unfortunate drawback of requiring the solution of a set of coupled differential algebraic equations (DAE). DAE's are not conducive to real-time implementation such as in a driving simulator, without a very expensive processing capability. The primary objective of this thesis is to show that multi-body models constructed from DAE's can be reasonably approximated with linear models using suspension elements that have nonlinear constitutive relationships. Three models were compared in this research, an experimental quarter-car test rig, a multi-body dynamics differential algebraic equation model, and a linear model with nonlinear suspension elements. Models constructed from differential algebraic equations are computationally expensive to compute and are difficult to realize for real-time simulations. Instead, a linear model with nonlinear elements was proposed for a more computationally efficient solution that would retain the nonlinearities of the suspension. Simplifications were made to the linear model with nonlinear elements to further reduce computation time for real-time simulation. The development process of each model is fully described in this thesis. Each model was excited with the same input and their outputs were compared. It was found that the linear model with nonlinear elements provides a reasonably good approximation of actual model with the differential algebraic equations.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartKwong_GH_T_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectSuspension Modelingen_US
dc.subjectReal Time Modelingen_US
dc.subjectDriving Simulatoren_US
dc.titleApproximations for Nonlinear Differential Algebraic Equations to Increase Real-time Simulation Efficiencyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSouthward, Steve C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaheri, Saieden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAhmadian, Mehdien_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05192010-094755/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-05-19en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-06-07
dc.date.adate2010-06-07en_US


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