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dc.contributor.authorBuckland, Donald Eugeneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:40:27Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:40:27Z
dc.date.issued1974-07-14en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07152010-020035en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/43723
dc.description.abstractThe classical objective of wildlife managers is to provide the public with the maximum number of hours of outdoor recreation by means of the wildlife resource without impairing that resource for future use. A biologist is continually concerned with the deterioration of wildlife populations and habitats. However, to evaluate populations and habitats from quantitative view is not sufficient; the quality or condition must also be evaluated if managers are to achieve their long-run objective. Any technique that would assist biologists in both quantitative and qualitative evaluations could further elucidate ecological nutritional relationships and could help assure that neither wildlife populations nor habitat would be seriously impaired for future use.en_US
dc.format.mediumBTDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartLD5655.V855_1974.B82.pdfen_US
dc.subjectfood consumptionen_US
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V855 1974.B82en_US
dc.titleBlood urea nitrogen levels of white-tailed deer as an index of condition and nutritional intake.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWildlife Managementen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKirkpatrick, Roy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMosby, Henry S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScanlon, Patrick F.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-07152010-020035/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-07-15en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-07-15
dc.date.adate2010-07-15en_US


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