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dc.contributor.authorCranmer, Elizabeth Nadineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:41:06Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:41:06Z
dc.date.issued2011-06-28en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07222011-150110en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/43872
dc.description.abstractAs the worldâ s population shifts toward living in cities, urbanization and its deleterious effects on the environment are a cause of increasing concern. The hyporheic zone is an important part of stream ecosystems, and here we focus on the effect of urbanization on the hyporheic zone from ten first-to-second-order streams within the Virginia Piedmont. We use sediment hydraulic conductivity and stream geomorphic complexity (vertical undulation of thalweg, channel sinuosity) as metrics of the potential for hyporheic exchange (hyporheic potential). Our results include bivariate plots that relate urbanization (e.g., total percent impervious) with hyporheic potential at several spatial scales. For example, at the watershed level, we observed a decrease in horizontal hydraulic conductivity with urbanization and an increase in vertical hydraulic conductivity, which ultimately results in a negligible trend from conflicting processes. Vertical geomorphic complexity increased with total percent impervious cover. This trend was somewhat unexpected and may be due to erosion of legacy sediment in stream banks. At the reach level, hydraulic conductivity increased and sinuosity decreased as the riparian buffer width increased; these trends are weak and are essentially negligible. The hydraulic conductivity results conform to expected trends and are a product of aforementioned concomitant processes. Our results emphasize the complexity of hydrologic and geomorphic processes occurring in urban stream systems at multiple scales. Overall, the watershed level effects enhancing hyporheic exchange, which is contrary to expectations. Given the importance of hyporheic exchange to stream function, further study is warranted to better understand the effects of urbanization.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartCranmer_EN_FairUse.PDFen_US
dc.relation.haspartCranmer_EN_T_2011.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectsedimenten_US
dc.subjecthydraulic conductivityen_US
dc.subjecthyporheicen_US
dc.subjectstreamen_US
dc.subjecturbanizationen_US
dc.titleEffect of Urbanization on the Hyporheic Zone: Lessons from the Virginia Piedmonten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Planningen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHester, Erich Todden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScott, Durelleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoglen, Glenn E.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-07222011-150110/en_US
dc.date.sdate2011-07-22en_US
dc.date.rdate2011-08-04
dc.date.adate2011-08-04en_US


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