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dc.contributor.authorCosenzo, Keryl Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:48:15Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:48:15Z
dc.date.issued1999-10-14en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-102799-172313en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/45326
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the roles of negative affect and cardiovascular reactivity on the attributional responding of hostile males. College males were screened with the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale (Cook & Medley, 1954). High and low hostile males were assigned to an arousal inducing (serial subtraction by 7's) or a non-arousal inducing condition (serial subtraction by 1's). Cardiovascular reactivity and self-report of affect were measured to the serial subtraction task. After the task was completed, the participant listened to a vignette (provocative or neutral) which depicted an interpersonal situation. The participant answered questions about the scene to assess attributional responding. The arousal-inducing condition was associated with significantly greater changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate and a higher level of self-reported negative affect than the non-arousal inducing condition. More negative attributions were reported for provocative than neutral scenes. Males in the arousal inducing condition made more negative attributions to neutral scenes than males in the non-arousal condition. There was no significant effect of arousal condition on the negative attributions to provocative scenes. Hostility did not influence the relationship between arousal condition and self-reported affect or arousal condition and attributional responding. This study showed that inducing cardiovascular reactivity prior to a neutral encounter with a partner can affect the males' perception of the potentially neutral encounter.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartKeryl-Cosenzo-Thesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectAttributionsen_US
dc.subjectHostilityen_US
dc.subjectCardiovascular Reactivityen_US
dc.subjectNegative Affecten_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Cardiovascular Reactivity and Negative Affect On The Responsibility Attributions of Hostile Men to Provocative Partner Behavioren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFranchina, Joseph J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarrison, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFriedman, Bruce H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEisler, Richard M.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-102799-172313/en_US
dc.date.sdate1999-10-27en_US
dc.date.rdate2000-10-30
dc.date.adate1999-10-30en_US


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