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dc.contributor.authorTaliaferro, Lauren Bethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:52:05Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:52:05Z
dc.date.issued1998-12-03en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-121798-134249en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/46317
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine which archetypal settings independent living residents of facilities that provide assisted living need and expect in the private living spaces of assisted living residences. The researcher developed an Archetypal Place Concept for Assisted Living Private Dwellings, based on work by Spivak (1984), which included eight archetypal categories with four sub-categories each. This concept was then used as a tool to evaluate scale models of assisted living dwellings constructed by independent living residents of retirement communities that offer assisted living. Seventeen residents in four retirement communities in Southwest Virginia participated in the research. The findings revealed that sample members believed all eight archetypal categories should be included in assisted living private dwellings. However, the degree to which the archetypal categories should be developed in a dwelling varied depending on whether the sample members were familiar with large or small assisted living dwellings. The most popular combination of sub-categories for sample members familiar with large assisted living dwellings was: multiple rooms not shared by unrelated adults, with separate sleep and living areas; separate sleep areas out of the living room with a door; bathrooms with a toilet, sink, shower, vanity closet, and linen closet; food storage with cooking appliances; two built-in closets; windows facing one direction, some with an outdoor area; separate seating for living and dining out of the sleep area; and kitchenettes with a refrigerator, sink, and cooking appliances. The most popular combination of sub-categories for sample members familiar with large assisted living dwellings was: one room not shared; a sleep area not shared, with no separate living room; a bathroom with a toilet, sink and shower, tied with toile, sink, shower, vanity storage, and linen closet; food storage with no cooking appliances; two built-in closets; windows facing one direction; designated seating arrangement within sleep area; and no kitchen, possible food storage. It was concluded that assisted living facilities should include a variety of dwelling types to meet different people's needs. However, any assisted living dwelling should include all eight archetypal categories to allow residents to function more comfortably.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartETDLBT.doc.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectAssisted Livingen_US
dc.subjectOlder Adultsen_US
dc.subjectArchetypal Placeen_US
dc.titleArchetypal Place Concept for Assisted Living Private Dwellingsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNear Environmentsen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Environmentsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBeamish, Julia O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcLain-Kark, Joan H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScott-Webber, Lennieen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-121798-134249/en_US
dc.date.sdate1998-12-17en_US
dc.date.rdate1999-12-18
dc.date.adate1998-12-18en_US


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