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dc.contributor.authorShadle, Brett L.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-24T20:31:59Zen
dc.date.available2014-03-24T20:31:59Zen
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier.citationBRETT L. SHADLE (2003). BRIDEWEALTH AND FEMALE CONSENT: MARRIAGE DISPUTES IN AFRICAN COURTS, GUSIILAND, KENYA. The Journal of African History, 44, pp 241-262, doi:10.1017/S0021853703008429en
dc.identifier.issn1469-5138en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/46783en
dc.description.abstractFrom the early 1940s Gusiiland (Kenya) underwent a series of transformations that pushed bridewealth to unheralded levels. As a result, many young couples could not afford a proper marriage and eloped. Some fathers forced their daughters into marriages with men wealthy enough to give cattle ; many of these women ran off instead with more desirable men. In the hundreds of resulting court cases, Gusii debated the relative weight to be given to bridewealth, parental approval and female consent in marriage. Young people did not reject marriage, but fought against senior men who would ignore women’s wishes. Gusii court elders usually agreed with fathers and husbands but also believed that female consent did carry some significance.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAcademy of Educational Developmenten
dc.description.sponsorshipAmerican Historical Associationen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectKenyaen
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.subjectmarriageen
dc.subjectlawen
dc.subjectcolonialen
dc.titleBridewealth and Female Consent: Marriage Disputes in African Courts, Gusiiland, Kenyaen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.identifier.urlhttp://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0021853703008429en
dc.date.accessed2014-03-24en
dc.title.serialJournal of African Historyen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0021853703008429en


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