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dc.contributorVirginia Tech
dc.contributor.authorStevens, G. N.
dc.contributor.authorJones, R. H.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-27T13:06:04Z
dc.date.available2014-03-27T13:06:04Z
dc.date.issued2006-03
dc.identifier.citationGlen N. Stevens and Robert H. Jones 2006. PATTERNS IN SOIL FERTILITY AND ROOT HERBIVORY INTERACT TO INFLUENCE FINE-ROOT DYNAMICS. Ecology 87:616-624. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/05-0809
dc.identifier.issn0012-9658
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/46836
dc.description.abstractFine-scale soil nutrient enrichment typically stimulates root growth, but it may also increase root herbivory, resulting in trade-offs for plant species and potentially influencing carbon cycling patterns. We used root ingrowth cores to investigate the effects of microsite fertility and root herbivory on root biomass in an aggrading upland forest in the coastal plain of South Carolina, USA. Treatments were randomly assigned to cores from a factorial combination of fertilizer and insecticide. Soil, soil fauna, and roots were removed from the cores at the end of the experiment (8-9 mo), and roots were separated at harvest into three diameter classes. Each diameter class responded differently to fertilizer and insecticide treatments. The finest roots (< 1.0 mm diameter), which comprised well over half of all root biomass, were the only ones to respond significantly to both treatments, increasing when fertilizer and when insecticide were added (each P < 0.0001), with maximum biomass found where the treatments were combined (interaction term significant, P < 0.001). These results Suggest that root-feeding insects have a strong influence on root standing crop with stronger herbivore impacts on finer roots and within more fertile microsites. Thus, increased vulnerability to root herbivory is a potentially significant,cost of root foraging in nutrient-rich patches.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation Grant DEB-0308847
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech Graduate Student Assembly
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEcological Society of America
dc.subjectelateridae
dc.subjectheterogeneity
dc.subjectroot foraging
dc.subjectroot ingrowth core
dc.subjectscarabaeidae
dc.subjectearly plant succession
dc.subjectbottom-up forces
dc.subjectinsect herbivory
dc.subjecttop-down
dc.subjectnutrient heterogeneity
dc.subjectcommunity structure
dc.subjecttallgrass prairie
dc.subjectspatial
dc.subjectvariation
dc.subjectunited-states
dc.subjectresponses
dc.titlePatterns in soil fertility and root herbivory interact to influence fine-root dynamics
dc.typeArticle - Refereed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.esajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1890/05-0809
dc.date.accessed2014-03-11
dc.title.serialEcology
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1890/05-0809


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