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dc.contributorVirginia Tech
dc.contributor.authorWalters, J. R.
dc.contributor.authorCrowder, L. B.
dc.contributor.authorPriddy, J. A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-27T13:06:08Z
dc.date.available2014-03-27T13:06:08Z
dc.date.issued2002-02
dc.identifier.citationJeffrey R. Walters, Larry B. Crowder, and Jeffery A. Priddy 2002. POPULATION VIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR RED-COCKADED WOODPECKERS USING AN INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODEL. Ecological Applications 12:249-260. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(2002)012[0249:PVAFRC]2.0.CO;2
dc.identifier.issn1051-0761
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/46853
dc.description.abstractRed-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) are distributed in the southeastern United States among closed populations whose maximum size is limited. Previous population viability analyses for this species have been confined to examination of threats posed by catastrophes and loss of genetic variability, because of the lack of demographic models that incorporate the extreme spatial constraints on dispersal that characterize this species. We used a spatially explicit, individual-based simulation model to assess the vulnerability of Red-cockaded Woodpecker populations to demographic and environmental stochasticity. Vulnerability to these threats was relatively low, because the presence of a substantial nonbreeding class (i.e., helpers) ameliorated the impact of stochastic variation in mortality and reproduction on the size of the breeding population. Because dispersal of helpers is spatially restricted, this effect was most pronounced when territories were aggregated or at high densities. Populations of 250 and 500 territories were stable regardless of the level of territory aggregation at the densities examined, whereas populations of 25, 49, and 100 territories ranged from rapidly declining to stable, depending on territory density and level of aggregation. Techniques that enable managers to maintain existing territories and create new ones are well established for this species. Thus managers may reasonably expect to maintain even small populations of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers by increasing the density, level of aggregation, and number of territories.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEcological Society of America
dc.subjectcooperative breeding
dc.subjectdemographic stochasticity
dc.subjectenvironmental
dc.subjectstochasticity
dc.subjectindividual-based model
dc.subjectmanagement
dc.subjectpicoides borealis
dc.subjectpopulation viability analysis
dc.subjectred-cockaded woodpecker
dc.subjectspatially
dc.subjectexplicit model
dc.subjectconservation biology
dc.subjectpicoides-borealis
dc.subjectsimulation-model
dc.subjectextinction
dc.subjectrisk
dc.subjectdispersal
dc.subjectmanagement
dc.subjectdynamics
dc.titlePopulation viability analysis for red-cockaded woodpeckers using an individual-based model
dc.typeArticle - Refereed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.esajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1890/1051-0761%282002%29012%5B0249%3APVAFRC%5D2.0.CO%3B2
dc.date.accessed2014-03-11
dc.title.serialEcological Applications
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.2307/3061150


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