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dc.contributorVirginia Tech
dc.contributor.authorHawdon, James
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-27T18:53:35Z
dc.date.available2014-03-27T18:53:35Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationHawdon, James (2012) Applying differential association theory to online hate groups: a theoretical statement. Research on Finnish Society Vol. 5: pp. 39–47.
dc.identifier.issn1796-8739
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/46864
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, I will consider how social media can nurture and encourage mass murder within a framework of one of the most prominent and widely supported criminological theories: differential association. I will briefly discuss the presence of hate groups on the web, and then I will review how the core principles of differential association are met and potentially amplified through social media. I then provide an example of the interconnectedness of hate groups, and conclude with a call for future research.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSocial and Economic Research Association of the Turku Universities
dc.subjectdifferential association
dc.subjecthate groups
dc.subjectsocial media
dc.titleApplying differential association theory to online hate groups: a theoretical statement
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.finnresearch.fi/rfs_Hawdon_2012.pdf
dc.date.accessed2014-03-27
dc.title.serialResearch on Finnish Society


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