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dc.contributor.authorHight, Alison Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-10T08:00:10Z
dc.date.available2014-06-10T08:00:10Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-09en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:3139en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/48655
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a chronologically comparative study of fairy culture and belief in early modern and Victorian Scotland. Using fairy culture as a case study, I examine the adaptability of folk culture by exploring whether beliefs and legends surrounding fairies in the early modern era continued into the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as a single culture system, or whether the Victorian fairy revival was a distinct cultural phenomenon. Based on contextual, physical, and behavioral comparisons, this thesis argues the former; while select aspects of fairy culture developed and adapted to serve the needs and values of Victorian society, its resurgence and popularization was largely predicated on the notion that it was a remnant of the past, therefore directly linking the nineteenth century interpretation to the early modern. In each era, fairy culture serves as a window into the major tensions complicating Scottish identity formation. In the early modern era, these largely centered around witchcraft, theology, and the Reformation, while notions of cultural heritage, national mythology, and escapist fantasy dominated Victorian fairy discourse. A comparative study on fairy culture demonstrates how cultural traditions can help link vastly different time periods and complicate traditional conceptions about periodization. Ultimately, this thesis reveals how issues of class impacted the popularization and persistence of fairy culture across both eras, reflecting ongoing discussions about Scottish identity.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectScotlanden_US
dc.subjectfairyen_US
dc.subjectnational identityen_US
dc.subjectcultural heritageen_US
dc.subjectwitchcraften_US
dc.subjectescapismen_US
dc.subjectclass cultureen_US
dc.title'What are ye, little mannie?': the Persistence of Fairy Culture in Scotland,1572-1703 and 1811-1927en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.description.degreeMAen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairAgmon, Dannaen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairCline, David P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGabriele, Matthew R.en_US


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