Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPatriquin, Michelle Anneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-24T06:00:08Z
dc.date.available2014-09-24T06:00:08Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-01en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:427en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/50539
dc.description.abstractCurrent literature suggests neurological (i.e., insula, amygdala) and autonomic (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia; RSA) markers of language, social, and behavioral challenges in autism spectrum disorders (ASD; Bal et al., 2010; DiMartino, Ross, et al., 2009; Lorenzi, Patriquin, & Scarpa, 2011; Patriquin, Scarpa, Friedman, & Porges, 2011), that hypothetically reflect a defensive neurophysiological circuit (i.e., hyper-arousal within the central and autonomic nervous systems). It is unknown how this neurophysiological state contributes to difficulties in ASD. Therefore, the current study quantified peripheral and central nervous system activity and investigated how this neurophysiological circuit may be related to different social and behavioral patterns that characterize ASD. Participants with (n = 16) and without (n = 30) ASD listened to classical music while brain (via functional magnetic resonance imaging) and autonomic (via pulse oximeter and plethysmogram) data were collected. Results indicated that decreased insula and amygdala activity during physiological hyper-aroused states predicted symptoms associated with ASD, and predicted higher levels of comorbid anxiety, stress, and depression. Contrary to hypotheses, no baseline RSA or amygdala differences were noted between ASD and controls groups, suggesting that adults with ASD may have developed effective coping strategies for reducing physiological threat responses. It will be important for future studies to continue to explore and clarify the neural connections of peripheral nervous system activation in individuals with and without ASD, including extending this research to children.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectdevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectsocial behavioren_US
dc.subjectrespiratory sinus arrhythmiaen_US
dc.subjectfMRIen_US
dc.subjectautismen_US
dc.titleDefensive Neurophysiological Response: Exploring the Neural and Autonoic Correlates of Social Behavioren_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairScarpa-Friedman, Angelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBell, Martha Annen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScarpa-Friedman, Bruce H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOllendick, Thomas H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKishida, Kenneth Tuckeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Susan Williamsen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record