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dc.contributor.authorLeveroos, Maura Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-30T07:00:11Z
dc.date.available2014-11-30T07:00:11Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-07en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:806en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/50950
dc.description.abstractPlanting woody biomass for energy production can be used as a mine reclamation procedure to satisfy the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) and provide renewable energy for the United States.  This study examines the economic viability of bioenergy production on previously mined lands using multiple hardwood species and treatments.  Five species were planted at two densities; one-half of the trees were fertilized in year two.  Height and diameter of the trees were measured annually for five years; the first three years by cooperating researchers at Virginia Tech, the last two years specifically for this report.  Current and predicted mass of the species, effects of planting density and fertilizer application, and the land expectation value (LEV) of each treatment were summarized.  A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how changes in production costs, stumpage price, rotation length, and interest rate affect the economic feasibility of bioenergy production.  Renewable energy and mine reclamation policies were investigated and it was determined that woody bioenergy can be planted as a mine reclamation procedure and may receive financial incentives.  Production cost appears to have the largest impact on LEV and is often the difference between positive and negative returns for the landowner.  The extra cost of fertilization and high density planting do not increase LEV; the unfertilized, low density treatments have the best LEV in all examined scenarios.  In general, bioenergy was found to be economically viable as a mine reclamation procedure only in limited circumstances.  In low cost, high price scenarios, bioenergy crops could have the potential to reforest both active and abandoned mine lands throughout southern Appalachia.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectPost mining land useen_US
dc.subjectSMCRAen_US
dc.subjecthardwood growthen_US
dc.subjectalternative energy productionen_US
dc.titleEconomic Viability of Woody Bioenergy Cropping for Surface Mine Reclamationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.description.degreeMSen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForestryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSullivan, Bradley Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThomas, Valerie Anneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAmacher, Gregory Sen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZipper, Carl Een_US


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