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dc.contributor.authorHartle, Brett Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-03T09:00:09Z
dc.date.available2014-12-03T09:00:09Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-02en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:3440en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/50961
dc.description.abstractThe Architect's first drawn line marks a significant moment where alteration to the site is conceived and intervention with nature is beset. Equilibrium of the natural order; vegetative, habitat, hydrology, and geology are all in a vulnerable state. Rarely do these develop into harmonious balances. More often they are imposed instances. The Industrial Revolution forever changed the relationship between humans and nature, tilting the weight of power towards man. While humans capacity for innovation and destruction have grown enormously, our dependence on the natural cycles and resources of the planet remain and grow more voracious. Yet simultaneously, modern progress has facilitated the physical and psychological detachment of that interdependence. The fundamental elements of our existence are veiled through the efficiency of urbanization and its derivatives of specialization, mass-production, and globalization. This project is an examination of the interrelationship between humans and nature through the lens of civic architecture within a naturalistic setting. The fundamental thesis of this project is that there is a primal biological thread that connects human beings to the natural order, whether on a visceral or conscious level. This project explores the belief that humans intrinsically yearn to reinforce that bond - awakening primordial instincts developed over millions of years of evolutionary survival that have been suppressed by the artifice of modern life. Through a process of retreat and contemplation, this project offers the opportunity of individuals to evaluate and rebalance their own scales with nature and find their own accord and harmony.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectnatureen_US
dc.subjectelementalen_US
dc.subjecttimelessen_US
dc.subjectweatheringen_US
dc.subjectinterventionen_US
dc.subjectspiriten_US
dc.titleLong Branch Nature Center - modern primitivism and the constructed dialogue of being within natureen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairPiedmont-Palladino, Susan C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEmmons, Paul F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolt, Jaanen_US


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