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dc.contributor.authorWright, Brielle Simoneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-24T09:00:07Z
dc.date.available2014-12-24T09:00:07Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-23en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:3939en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/51158
dc.description.abstractIt is projected that the majority population will become the minority population by 2050. In order to serve the needs of an ethnically diverse U.S. population, corporate agribusinesses are encouraged to employ an ethnically diverse workforce. The purpose of this research was to understand how attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control in the workplace affects the intent of underrepresented groups to remain in working for their current corporate agribusiness. In current agriculture research, there are very few studies that focus on the experiences of underrepresented groups in corporate agribusinesses. There is also very little research and public information that provides the number of underrepresented students who are recruited and retained in corporate agribusinesses from year to year. For this reason the author sought to explore the experiences of underrepresented groups who work for agricultural organizations and gain an understanding of factors that impact their intentions to maintain a career in the field. Using a phenomenological qualitative research study design, individual interviews were conducted with underrepresented employees from various corporate agribusinesses from across the United States. A review of the findings indicate that underrepresented groups who work for corporate agribusinesses are satisfied with their jobs in terms of compensation, work/life balance, and the opportunities for advancement. Yet, they are sometimes faced with micro-aggressions, at times feel they are treated differently because of their race, and often work in cultural climates that lack inclusion and/or cultural intelligence. As a result the majority of the participants who participated in the study felt that they would remain with their corporate agribusiness employer until they found a new company to work for, started their own business, or a better opportunity presented itself. The findings from this study also show that anyone seeking employment in corporate agribusinesses need to have effective communication skills, cultural and emotional intelligence, agricultural competency, and a true passion for their field of agriculture in order to be successful in the industry. Other findings show that underrepresented groups and their White counterparts need to be educated on the contributions that underrepresented groups have made to the agricultural field in efforts to change the negative perceptions that underrepresented groups have about agriculture.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectAgribusinessen_US
dc.subjectDiversityen_US
dc.subjectRecruitmenten_US
dc.subjectRetentionen_US
dc.subjectUnderrepresented Groupsen_US
dc.titleRetention of underrepresented groups in corporate agribusinesses: Assessing the intentions of underrepresented groups to remain working for corporate agribusinessesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAgricultural and Extension Educationen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Extension Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFriedel, Curtis Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFaulkner, Paula E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, James C.en_US


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