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dc.contributor.authorObilade, Titilola T.
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-03T16:39:49Z
dc.date.available2015-03-03T16:39:49Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationObilade, T. T. (2015). The Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Exclusive Breastfeeding among Mothers in Two Semi-Urban Areas around a Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) designated hospital in Lagos State, Nigeria. International Archives of Medicine, 8(15). doi: 10.3823/1614en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/51582
dc.description.abstractBackground: The World health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) initiated intensive efforts to transform hospitals into breastfeeding support centers through the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). The study populations in this study were geographically located within the vicinity of a BFHI designated Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of exclusive breast feeding among mothers in two semi-urban areas around a BFHI designated hospital. Method: Four hundred self-administered questionnaires were distributed to mothers from two semi urban areas in Surulere Local Government Area of Lagos, Nigeria to ascertain their socio demographic data, knowledge, attitude and practice of exclusive breastfeeding. Approval for the study was granted by the Ethics Committee. The respondents were chosen by simple random sampling. The questions covered socio demographic data, knowledge, attitude and the practice of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF). Collected data was analyzed and investigated for statistical associations. Results: The knowledge, attitude and practice of exclusive breastfeeding amongst mothers in the semi urban area of Lagos, Nigeria is statistically significantly affected by their educational level and by their professional level. Those with a higher level of education were more likely to have a correct knowledge (P < 0.05). Religion, educational level, professional level and number of children were statistically significant for practicing EBF for at least three months (P < 0.05). The belief that colostrum is not good for the baby was statistically significant for educational level and profession (P < 0.05). The belief that sperm could get into the breast milk was statistically significant for age, religion, ethnic group, education, profession and the number of children (P < 0.05). Out of all the socio demographic variables examined, educational level of the mother and the mother’s professional level were the two variables that were most frequently statistically significant for knowledge, attitude and practice questions. Conclusion: The knowledge, attitude and practice of breastfeeding are mostly affected by the education and the profession of the mother. Certain beliefs about breast milk and sperm were statistically significant across all the socio demographic data examined. Recommendations were made to increase health education targeted at correcting beliefs about colostrum and breast milk. Recommendation was also made for a reevaluation of BFHI.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectNigeriaen_US
dc.subjectExclusive breastfeeding (EBF)en_US
dc.subjectBaby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI)en_US
dc.subjectKnowledgeen_US
dc.subjectAttitudeen_US
dc.subjectPracticeen_US
dc.subjectPredictive Factorsen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectSocio demographic factorsen_US
dc.subjectColostrumen_US
dc.titleThe Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Exclusive Breastfeeding among Mothers in Two Semi-Urban Areas around a Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) Designated Hospital in Lagos State, Nigeriaen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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