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dc.contributorVirginia Tech. School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciencesen_US
dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Department of Chemical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributorInstituto Nicolas Cabrera Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco. Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias. Fluorescence Imaging Groupen_US
dc.contributor.authordel Rosal, Blancaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Chenen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoufakis, Despina N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Changen_US
dc.contributor.authorJaque, Danielen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-20T22:22:12Z
dc.date.available2015-04-20T22:22:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-15
dc.identifier.citationdel Rosal, B., Sun, C., Loufakis, D. N., Lu, C., & Jaque, D. (2013). Thermal loading in flow-through electroporation microfluidic devices. Lab on a Chip, 13(15), 3119-3127. doi: 10.1039/C3LC50382H
dc.identifier.issn1473-0197
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/51727
dc.description.abstractThermal loading effects in flow-through electroporation microfluidic devices have been systematically investigated by using dye-based ratiometric luminescence thermometry. Fluorescence measurements have revealed the crucial role played by both the applied electric field and flow rate on the induced temperature increments at the electroporation sections of the devices. It has been found that Joule heating could raise the intra-channel temperature up to cytotoxic levels (>45 °C) only when conditions of low flow rates and high applied voltages are applied. Nevertheless, when flow rates and electric fields are set to those used in real electroporation experiments we have found that local heating is not larger than a few degrees, i.e. temperature is kept within the safe range (<32 °C). We also provide thermal images of electroporation devices from which the heat affected area can be elucidated. Experimental data have been found to be in excellent agreement with numerical simulations that have also revealed the presence of a non-homogeneous temperature distribution along the electroporation channel whose magnitude is critically dependent on both applied electric field and flow rate. Results included in this work will allow for full control over the electroporation conditions in flow-through microfluidic devices.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.). Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems (CBET) Division - 1016547
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.). Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems (CBET) Division - 1041834
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.). Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems (CBET) Division - 0967069
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad Autonoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid - Project S2009/MAT-1756
dc.description.sponsorshipSpanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia - MAT2010-16161
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Society of Chemistry
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
dc.subjectElectroporationen_US
dc.subjectMicrofluidicsen_US
dc.subjectMicrofluidic devicesen_US
dc.titleThermal loading in flow-through electroporation microfluidic devicesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.urlhttp://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2013/lc/c3lc50382h#!divAbstract
dc.date.accessed2015-04-17
dc.title.serialLab on a Chip
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1039/C3LC50382H
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
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