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dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Institute of Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS) Sustainable Nanotechnology Center (VTSuN)en_US
dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Department of Sustainable Biomaterialsen_US
dc.contributorDuke University. Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT)en_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, Haoranen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Katiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRenneckar, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorVikesland, Peter J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-21T14:11:31Z
dc.date.available2015-04-21T14:11:31Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-26
dc.identifier.citationWei, H., Rodriguez, K., Renneckar, S., & Vikesland, P. J. (2014). Environmental science and engineering applications of nanocellulose-based nanocomposites. Environmental Science: Nano, 1(4), 302-316. doi: 10.1039/C4EN00059E
dc.identifier.issn2051-8153
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/51740
dc.description.abstractCompared with cellulose, the primary component of the paper we use every day, nanocellulose has a much smaller diameter (typically <10 nm) that renders it many unique properties. Amongst many others, these properties include high mechanical strength, large surface area and low visual light scattering. Nanocellulose can be obtained by disintegration of plant cellulose pulp or by the action of specific types of bacteria. Once produced, nanocellulose can be used to make transparent films, fibers, hydrogels, or aerogels that exhibit extraordinary mechanical, thermal, and optical properties. Each of these substrates is a suitable template or carrier for inorganic nanoparticles (NPs), thus enabling production of nanocomposites that possess properties of the two constituents. In this review, we focus on the preparation of nanocellulose, nanocellulose films, and nanocellulose papers, and introduce nanocellulose-based nanocomposites and their environmental applications.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.) - BES 1236005
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech. Graduate School. Sustainable Nanotechnology Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Program (VTSuN IGEP)
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.) and Environmental Protection Agency - NSF Cooperative Agreement EF-0830093 - Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology (CEINT)
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Society of Chemistry
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOpen access articles from Environmental Science: Nano
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEnvironmental Science: Nano Recent Review Articles
dc.relation.urihttp://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/articlecollectionlanding?sercode=en&themeid=21105d96-4d4f-47f3-abe1-699ef324280e
dc.relation.urihttp://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/articlecollectionlanding?sercode=en&themeid=372f079f-ec0d-4296-8a49-8aa8241b14f9
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
dc.subjectNanocelluloseen_US
dc.subjectNanocompositesen_US
dc.subjectNanomaterialsen_US
dc.subjectNanotechnologyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental engineeringen_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental science and engineering applications of nanocellulose-based nanocompositesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.urlhttp://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2014/en/c4en00059e
dc.date.accessed2015-04-16
dc.title.serialEnvironmental Science: Nano
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1039/C4EN00059E
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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