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dc.contributor.authorLeech, Irene Ellisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-29T18:30:56Z
dc.date.available2015-04-29T18:30:56Z
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/51934
dc.description.abstractAmerica's population is aging. People are living longer and medical advances continue to make that true. Many citizens count on social security as a major source of retirement income. Future retirees will find that there will be fewer workers to support them ard unless the nation stops borrowing from the social security fund to finance the deficit, there will be less money for retirees. All of this means that it is important for individuals to save for retirement. Martin Fishbein developed the Behavioral Intention Model to explain various behaviors. According to the model, attitude and subjective norm explain the variation in the intention to behave a certain way and there is a high correlation between intention and behavior when using this model. Indirect measures of attitude and subjective norm increase understanding of these variables. 'I‘he Fishbein model and an extended version of it, to which demographic variables were added, were tested in this study. Five hundred Virginia Tech classified employees received the mail survey instrument, which was based upon Dillman's specifications, in June 1988. A 74.6% response was received. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlations, t-tests, multiple regression, ard path analysis. While the Fishbein model accounted for 22% of the variation in the intention to save for retirement, the extended rrodel accounted for 40% of the variation. In addition to attitude, number of assets, having a deperdent child between the ages of 5 ard 13, number of years expected to live after retirement, ard age made significant contributions to the variation in the intenticn. It was concluded that the extended model is a better theoretical framework for explaining the intention to save for retirement. 'Ihere were statistically ard practically significant differences in the irdirect measurers of attitude ard subjective nom for those who interded to save ard those who did not. However it was apparent that neither group believed that saving now will assure than of financial security in retiranent. Additional research is needed to further explore the variables which influence irdividual's intentions to save for retirementen_US
dc.format.extentxi, 140 leavesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V856 1988.L4444en_US
dc.subject.lcshRetirementen_US
dc.subject.lcshRetirement incomeen_US
dc.subject.lcshSaving and investmenten_US
dc.titleThe intention to save for retirement : the influence of attitudes and subjective normsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHousing, Interior Design, and Resource Managementen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19009108en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHousing, Interior Design, and Resource Managementen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBarclay, Nancy A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKeffer, Wayne M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScott, Elaine D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLovingood, Rebecca P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSporakowski, Michael J.en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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