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dc.contributor.authorZhu, Zhiguangen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-30T06:00:39Z
dc.date.available2015-04-30T06:00:39Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-11en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:984en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/51948
dc.description.abstractEnzyme-catalyzed biofuel cells would be a great alternative to current battery technology, as they are clean, safe, and capable of using diverse and abundant renewable biomass with high energy densities, at mild reaction conditions. However, currently, three largest technical challenges for emerging enzymatic fuel cell technologies are incomplete oxidation of most fuels, limited power output, and short lifetime of the cell. Synthetic pathway biotransformation is a technology of assembling a number of enzymes coenzymes for producing low-value biocommodities. In this work, it was applied to generate bioelectricity for the first time. Non-natural enzymatic pathways were developed to utilize maltodextrin and glucose in enzymatic fuel cells. Three immobilization approaches were compared for preparing enzyme electrodes. Thermostable enzymes from thermophiles were cloned and expressed for improving the lifetime and stability of the cell. To further increase the power output, non-immobilized enzyme system was demonstrated to have higher power densities compared to those using immobilized enzyme system, due to better mass transfer and retained native enzyme activities. With the progress on pathway development and power density/stability improvement in enzymatic fuel cells, a high energy density sugar-powered enzymatic fuel cell was demonstrated. The enzymatic pathway consisting of 13 thermostable enzymes enabled the complete oxidation of glucose units in maltodextrin to generate 24 electrons, suggesting a high energy density of such enzymatic fuel cell (300 Wh/kg), which was several folds higher than that of a lithium-ion battery. Maximum power density was 0.74 mW/cm2 at 50 deg C and 20 mM fuel concentration, which was sufficient to power a digital clock or a LED light. These results suggest that enzymatic fuel cells via synthetic pathway biotransformation could achieve high energy density, high power density and increased lifetime. Future efforts should be focused on further increasing power density and enzyme stability in order to make enzymatic fuel cells commercially applicable.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectenzymatic fuel cellsen_US
dc.subjectbioelectricityen_US
dc.subjectsynthetic pathway biotransformationen_US
dc.subjectenzymatic pathwayen_US
dc.subjectenergy densityen_US
dc.subjectpower densityen_US
dc.titleEnzymatic fuel cells via synthetic pathway biotransformationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairZhang, Yi Heng Percivalen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSenger, Ryan S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLu, Changen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Douglas J.en_US


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