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dc.contributor.authorWeberg, Matthew Aaronen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-06T06:00:12Z
dc.date.available2015-05-06T06:00:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-20en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:1753en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/52022
dc.description.abstractThe primary objectives of this study were: 1) to evaluate the movement patterns, habitat use, and survival of triploid grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella stocked to control hydrilla Hydrilla verticillata in a riverine reservoir (Claytor Lake, Virginia), 2) to examine grass carp population dynamics and hydrilla growth dynamics in Claytor Lake to guide long-term management efforts, and 3) to describe the aquatic plant community in the New River upstream of Claytor Lake to assess the potential for alterations due to potential grass carp herbivory. Only 3% of radio-tagged grass migrated out of Claytor Lake during the 2-year study. Grass carp movement patterns were significantly correlated with temperature-, weather-, and habitat-related variables. Grass carp selected specific cove, shoal and tributary habitats colonized by hydrilla. First-year survival of grass carp was 44% in 2011, and 25% in 2012. Grass carp growth rates were rapid in 2011, but declined in 2012 concurrent with significant reductions in hydrilla abundance. Based on grass carp population dynamics observed in Claytor Lake, our stocking model predicted that hydrilla could be controlled through 2030 by a grass carp standing stock of 5-6 metric tons. We documented 12 plant species in the New River upstream of Claytor Lake, 9 of which are preferred plants for grass carp suggesting that the plant community could be altered if migration rates increase. Grass carp can be effective for managing hydrilla in riverine reservoirs; however, continued monitoring of grass carp population dynamics, migration rates, and vegetation abundance could facilitate greater precision in management efforts.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectbiological controlen_US
dc.subjectpopulation dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectradio telemetryen_US
dc.subjectgrass carpen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of Grass Carp Dynamics to Optimize Hydrilla Control in an Appalachian Reservoiren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFisheries and Wildlife Sciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and Wildlife Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMurphy, Brian R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRypel, Andrew Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCastello, Leandroen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCopeland, John Rogersen_US


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