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dc.contributor.authorKelinsky, Lia R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-08T08:01:29Z
dc.date.available2015-05-08T08:01:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-07en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5535en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/52044
dc.description.abstractMen and masculine qualities stereotypically define leadership. Role Congruity Theory explains that women leaders may experience a double discrimination. First, because leadership roles are stereotypically male, a woman may not have the necessary qualities. Second, because leadership qualities are stereotypically masculine, when women do exhibit agentic qualities, they are perceived negatively and not feminine (Eagly and Karau, 2002). Further, adopting a masculine style is perceived as an inauthentic leadership style. However, an androgynous style can blend feminine expectations with corporate needs, creating advantage and perceptions of authenticity (Tzinerr and Barsheshet-Picke, 2014). The leadership development training described in this thesis was held for female volunteer counselors of Girls Rock! Roanoke, an empowerment camp for young girls. The appreciative pedagogy included individual reflections, group discussions, and working through simulations. The evaluation of the training sought to identify: if discussion of leadership increased awareness of feminine and masculine leadership; if discussion of personal leadership experiences increased empowerment to self-identify as leaders; and what impact the experience had on participants' ability to improve and employ leadership. After participants completed the training, awareness of feminine and androgynous leadership increased; whereas, it is unclear if awareness of masculine leadership increased. Challenging participants to reflect on their leadership increased their self-identification as leaders, while those who already identified did so in androgynous terms. The training impacted participants' knowledge of themselves as leaders, how they planned to use leadership in camp and in real life, but it is unclear to what degree it impacted their ability to improve and employ leadership beyond the training.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectProgram Evaluationen_US
dc.subjectLeadershipen_US
dc.subjectWomen's Leadership Developmenten_US
dc.titleThe Evaluation of a Women's Leadership Development Training for Girls Rock! Roanokeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAgricultural and Extension Educationen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Extension Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairAnderson, James C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArchibald, Thomas Greigen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaufman, Eric K.en_US


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