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dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Department of Mechanical Engineering. Vibration and Acoustics Laboratoriesen_US
dc.contributorUniversite de Technologie de Compiegne. Departement Genie Mecanique, Division Acoustique et Vibrationen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuigou, Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Chris R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWagstaff, Peter R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-27T19:50:24Z
dc.date.available2015-05-27T19:50:24Z
dc.date.issued1994-07-01
dc.identifier.citationGuigou, C., Fuller, C. R., & Wagstaff, P. R. (1994). Active isolation of vibration with adaptive structures. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 96(1), 294-299. doi: 10.1121/1.411439en_US
dc.identifier.issn0001-4966en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/52696
dc.description.abstractThe problem of actively isolating the periodic vibrations of a rigid machine mounted on a supporting flexible structure is usually approached by applying the active inputs in parallel or series with the passive inputs. This has a number of disadvantages which are related to the development of a high power, compact yet stiff/active isolation unit. In this experimental work, a new approach in which the receiving structure is considered to have adaptive properties is studied. The aim is to control the transmitted vibrations by distributed arrays of piezoelectric transducers bonded to the receiving structure. The experimental rig consists of a rigid thick plate (the machine) supported at the corners by four elastic springs mounted on a thin clamped-free elastic steel plate (the receiving structure). The thick plate is driven by a harmonic force input. Response in the receiving panel is measured with a scanning laser vibrometer. Active inputs to the receiving structure are induced by three pairs of piezoceramic actuators bonded to the surface and configured to induce bending. The error sensors consist of up to two polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) strips attached to the panel surface in various positions. The control approach uses a two channel feedforward adaptive LMS algorithm implemented on a TMS320C25. The results show that the first three modes of the system can be controlled efficiently when driven ''on resonance,'' thus effectively isolating the vibrating structure from the ''machine'' raft input. However, when the system is driven ''off resonance,'' the vibrations of the receiving structure proved more difficult td reduce effectively. The paper presents vibration distribution of the receiving plate with and without control for a number of input frequencies as well as a variety of control transducer configurations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLangley Research Centeren_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Office of Naval Research - Grant No. ONR-N00014-88-K-0721en_US
dc.format.extent6 pagesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of Americaen_US
dc.subjectElasticityen_US
dc.subjectControl systemsen_US
dc.subjectPiezoelectric transducersen_US
dc.subjectPosition sensitive detectorsen_US
dc.subjectSurface structureen_US
dc.titleActive isolation of vibration with adaptive structuresen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.urlhttp://scitation.aip.org/content/asa/journal/jasa/96/1/10.1121/1.411439en_US
dc.date.accessed2015-05-12en_US
dc.title.serialJournal of the Acoustical Society of Americaen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1121/1.411439
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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