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dc.contributor.authorKatsimbras, Arian Nicholasen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-17T08:02:23Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-17T08:02:23Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-15en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5401en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/52954en
dc.description.abstractIn these lyric-narrative poems, the speaker is under constant threat of violence, trouble, danger, or death, but that death is never realized. Rather, the speaker, much like many of the lives in the desert, not only survives amidst the constant threat of violence, but flourishes because of it; the interior landscape of the speaker, the tenor of the language and syntax, and exterior landscapes implied in these poems are mirror surfaces, and as such, so are we. Despite the exterior world and relationships being arguably broken down, failed, impoverished, abandoned, etc., these poems gesture toward a sense of redemption, hope, reverence for life, and a kind of holiness that are found in the church of the desert. It has been said that the desert is monotheistic; if this is the case, then the speaker and the lives in these poems, despite being hardened by the desert, sing hymnals that celebrate that faith. There is a church in the wild.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectPoetryen
dc.titleMy Mother and Father Were Astronautsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentEnglishen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Fine Artsen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Fine Artsen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineCreative Writingen
dc.contributor.committeechairHicok, Robert G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMeitner, Erika S.en
dc.contributor.committeememberD'Aguiar, Frederick M.en


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