Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHa, Sean Anthonyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-30T08:01:09Z
dc.date.available2015-06-30T08:01:09Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-29en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5553en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/53949
dc.description.abstractIn the push for spectrum sharing and open spectrum access, the 3.5 GHz frequency band is under consideration for small cells and general Wireless Local Area Networks (WLAN) in the United States. The same band is beginning to see deployment in China, Japan, and South Korea, for the 4G Long Term Evolution (LTE) cellular standard to increase coverage and capacity in urban areas through small cell deployment. However, since the adoption of this band is new, there is a distinct shortage of propagation data and accurate channel modeling at 3.5 GHz in indoor environments. These models are necessary for cellular coverage planning and evaluating the performance and feasibility of wireless systems. This report presents the results of a fixed wireless channel measurement campaign at 3.5 GHz. Measurements were taken in environments typical of indoor wireless deployment: traditional urban indoor office, hallway, classroom, computer laboratory, and atrium areas, as well as within a hospital. Primarily Non Line of Sight (NLOS) experiments were carried out in areas with a controllable amount of partitions separating the transmitter and receiver in order to document material-based attenuation values. Indoor-to-outdoor measurements were carried out, focusing on attenuation due to common exterior building materials such as concrete, brick, wood, and reinforced glass. Documented metrics include large scale path loss, log-normal shadowing, and channel power delay profiles combined with delay spread characteristics for multipath analysis. The statistical multi-antenna diversity gain was evaluated to gauge the benefit of using multi-antenna systems in an indoor environment, which has much greater spatial diversity than an outdoor environment. Measurements were compared to indoor path loss models used for WLAN planning in the low GHz range to investigate the applicability of extending these models to 3.5 GHz.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subject3.5 GHzen_US
dc.subjectpath lossen_US
dc.subjectindoor propagationen_US
dc.subjectchannel modelen_US
dc.subjectMIMOen_US
dc.subjectspectrum sharingen_US
dc.title3.5 GHz Indoor Propagation Modeling and Channel Characterizationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairReed, Jeffrey Hughen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcGwier, Robert W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Christopher Roberten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record