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dc.contributor.authorCross, Kelly J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-08T08:00:33Z
dc.date.available2015-07-08T08:00:33Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-15en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5572en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/54025
dc.description.abstractTeam projects in engineering are critical sites for professional and personal development as students interact with peers and faculty on projects designed to simulate engineering work. These projects allow students to try on professional roles and establish a sense of identity within their field, which in turn influences their retention through college and into engineering careers. However, team projects can present challenges specific to students from underrepresented populations. While research on women's team experiences is strong, few researchers have studied African-Americans. To fill this gap, the current study explores the experiences of African-American males on multiracial student teams and the impact of those teams on these students' identities. This qualitative study employed a phenomenological approach, using a three-interview sequence with eight African-American male engineering students as they worked on team projects at a predominantly white institution (PWI). The interviews gathered background information about each participant, explored the team functionality during the project, and enabled participants to reflect on the team experience. Two theoretical frameworks were considered during the study design: 1) intergroup contact theory provided a lens to explore interracial interactions, and 2) multiple identities provided a lens to analyze the impact of team dynamics on students' intersecting identities. The findings provide a rich understanding of the team experiences of African-American male students that can enhance project-based teaching within engineering to more explicitly attend to team dynamics, including interracial interactions for students of color. Both positive and negative impacts on African-American males in engineering emerged from the intergroup contact within the team environment. Specifically, the results indicate that these participants enjoyed their multiracial student teaming experiences, supported by informal social interactions among team members and generally positive professional interactions. However, the study participants also entered their team experiences fully aware of the negative stereotypes about African-Americans in engineering and proactively worked to dispel those stereotypes.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectintergroup contacten_US
dc.subjectmultiracial student teamsen_US
dc.subjectmultiple identitiesen_US
dc.titleThe Experiences of African-American Males on Multiracial Student Teams in Engineeringen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEngineering Educationen_US
dc.description.degreePHDen_US
thesis.degree.namePHDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEngineering Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairParetti, Marie Cen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatusovich, Hollyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSeniors, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWatford, Bevlee Aen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPoe, Mya Annen_US


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