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dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Virginia Tech Transportation Instituteen_US
dc.contributorChowdhury, Tanveeren_US
dc.contributor.authorBlanco, Myraen_US
dc.contributor.authorHankey, Jonathan M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDingus, Thomas A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-31T20:05:13Z
dc.date.available2015-07-31T20:05:13Z
dc.date.issued2005-12en_US
dc.identifier.citationBlanco, M., Hankey, J. M., & Dingus, T. A. (2005). Enhanced night visibility series, volume iv: Phase ii - study 2: Visual performance during nighttime driving in rain. (FHWA-RD-94-076). Washington, DC: United States. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved from http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/research/safety/humanfac/04135/04135.pdf.en_US
dc.identifier.govdocFHWA-HRT-04-135en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/55087
dc.description.abstractPhase II, Study 2 (rainy weather) was performed following the same procedures used for Study 1 (clear weather). Study 2 helped expand the knowledge of how current vision enhancement systems can affect detection and recognition of different types of objects while driving during adverse weather, specifically during rain conditions. The empirical testing for this study was performed on the Virginia Smart Road; the rain was controlled by weather making equipment. Thirty participants were involved in the study. A 12 by 7 by 3 mixed factorial design was used to investigate the effects of different types of vision enhancement systems, different types of objects on the roadway, and driver's age on detection and recognition distances; subjective evaluations also were obtained for the different vision enhancement systems. The results of the empirical testing suggest that vision enhancement systems that include halogen headlamps as their main component (i.e., halogen alone or halogen with ultraviolet A) consistently allow drivers the best detections during rain conditions. In fact, the halogen headlamp (low-beam configuration) provides the longest detection and recognition distances overall; in the few trials where other systems allow farther detection distances, these differences did not represent meaningful improvements. Even drivers using the infrared thermal imaging system, which resulted in farther detection distances for pedestrians and cyclists under clear conditions, perform no differently in the rain than when only the low beams of the vehicle were used.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Federal Highway Administration. Office of Safety R&Den_US
dc.format.extent141 pagesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUnited States. Federal Highway Administrationen_US
dc.subjectAgeen_US
dc.subjectCyclisten_US
dc.subjectDetectionen_US
dc.subjectHalogenen_US
dc.subjectHeadlampen_US
dc.subjectHigh intensity discharge (HID)en_US
dc.subjectInfrareden_US
dc.subjectNight visionen_US
dc.subjectNighttimeen_US
dc.subjectPedestrianen_US
dc.subjectRainen_US
dc.subjectRecognitionen_US
dc.subjectVision enhancement systemen_US
dc.subjectWeatheren_US
dc.titleEnhanced Night Visibility Series, Volume IV: Phase II - Study 2: Visual Performance During Nighttime Driving in Rainen_US
dc.typeGovernment documenten_US
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/research/safety/humanfac/04135/04135.pdfen_US
dc.date.accessed2015-06-29en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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