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dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Virginia Tech Transportation Instituteen_US
dc.contributorOpus International Consultantsen_US
dc.contributorKaulfers, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorRobak, Annaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-11T18:46:32Z
dc.date.available2015-08-11T18:46:32Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-04en_US
dc.identifier.citationRobak, A. (2015, June). Private sector business principles to embrace - and to avoid - in planning and managing our public sector assets. Paper presented at the 9th International Conference on Managing Pavement Assets, Alexandria, VA. Presentation retrieved from www.apps.vtti.vt.edu/PDFs/icmpa9/session15/Robak.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/56428
dc.description.abstractThere is an increasing demand from the public and from legislators to treat pavement management like a business - know what you have, know what it is worth, and invest strategically. The private and public sectors, however, differ fundamentally in their purposes: the private sector aims to make and grow profits, while the public sector aims to support and improve society - financial profits and losses versus wider costs and benefits such as environmental and social impacts. Conversely, the private sector has begun to evaluate and discover the positive impacts of environmental protection and social responsibility on its profit margins. The public and private sectors have much to learn from each other. This paper explores the management principles and tools used in the private sector that should be adopted in the pavement management sphere in order to better evaluate and communicate the impacts of our investments, with the aim of enhancing our economic, social and environmental sustainability. These principles include evaluating our entire portfolio against our goals - including assessing alternative service provision mechanisms - and redirecting our investments to more 'profitable' areas. In addition to adopting private sector principles, many of our public sector principles and tools, such as pavement performance modeling and whole of life costing, should continue to play a strong role and should be further developed. This paper discusses how new and existing principles can be brought together for more sustainable and robust investment decisions - and, importantly, how they can be used to better communicate investment needs to stakeholders.en_US
dc.format.extent15 pagesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartof9th International Conference on Managing Pavement Assetsen_US
dc.subjectPublic sector - private sector differencesen_US
dc.subjectEffectiveness and efficiencyen_US
dc.titlePrivate sector business principles to embrace - and to avoid - in planning and managing our public sector assetsen_US
dc.title.alternativePrivate sector business principles to adopt & avoiden_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.description.notesPresented during Session 15: Data Quality and Accountability, moderated by Linda Pierce, at the 9th International Conference on Managing Pavement Assets (ICMPA9) in Alexandria, VA.en_US
dc.description.notesIncludes conference paper and PowerPoint slides.en_US
dc.identifier.urlwww.apps.vtti.vt.edu/PDFs/icmpa9/session15/Robak.pdfen_US
dc.date.accessed2015-07-07en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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