Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDemonaco, Stefanieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T19:55:10Z
dc.date.available2015-09-18T19:55:10Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-27en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:6017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/56557
dc.description.abstractBackground: Biliary sludge is associated with gallbladder (GB) dysmotility and mucus hypersecretion suggesting that these factors could lead to GB mucoceles. If biliary sludge does progress to GB mucoceles, treatments to reduce the production and progression of sludge are warranted. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the natural history of biliary sludge in dogs. Animals: Healthy, client-owned dogs (n=74) screened for biliary sludge; 42 affected dogs identified Methods: Prospective, observational design. Serial ultrasound examinations and biochemistries were evaluated over 1 year. The following were determined: percentage of the GB filled with sludge (mild (0.01%-24.4%), moderate (24.5%-49.4%), moderate to severe (49.5%-74.4%), severe (74.5%-100%)), gravity dependency of sludge, GB dimensions, and biochemical indices (ALT, GGT, ALP, total bilirubin, albumin, total calcium, triglycerides, and cholesterol). Mixed model ANOVA, Friedman chi-square, Mantel-Haenzsel chi-square tests, and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed to detect significant changes in these parameters. Significance at P <0.05. Results: After 1 year of follow-up, the percentage of the GB filled by sludge was mild (34%), moderate (47%), moderate to severe (13%), severe (3%), or absent (3%) with no significant difference in the median degree of biliary sludge within 1 year (P=0.36). There was no significant change in the gravity dependency of sludge over 1 year. Dogs had resolved (2%), decreased (19%), static (40%), increased (29%), or recurrent (10%) sludge at the conclusion of the study. Biochemical indices or GB volume were not significantly different over time or among groups. Conclusion: Biliary sludge is prevalent, affected dogs remain asymptomatic, and it rarely resolves in healthy dogs over a period of 1 year. Some dogs developed non-gravity dependent sludge within 1 year, which may indicate changes in consistency.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectCanineen_US
dc.subjectGallbladderen_US
dc.subjectMucoceleen_US
dc.titleNatural History of Biliary Sludge in Dogsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentVeterinary Medicineen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical and Veterinary Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairGrant, David C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeib, Michael S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCecere, Thomas Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLarson, Martha M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPanciera, David Lawrenceen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record