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dc.contributor.authorComer, Clinton Samuelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-28T06:00:30Z
dc.date.available2015-10-28T06:00:30Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-05en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:3109en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/56981
dc.description.abstractStroke, or cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a prominent cause of long term disability in the United States. It has been evidenced that the outcome of a CVA patient differs as a function of the cerebral hemisphere that is damaged by the stroke, especially in terms of emotional changes. The Right Hemisphere Model of Emotion posits that the right hemisphere is specialized for processing emotional content, regardless of valence. In contrast, the Bi-Hemispheric Model of Emotion posits that each hemisphere has its own emotional specialization. The current experiment tested the competing predictions of the two theoretical perspectives in a mixed sample of left cerebrovascular accident (LCVA) patients and right cerebrovascular accident (RCVA) patients using a Dichotic Listening task and the Affective Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AAVLT). Heart Rate (HR) and Pulse Oxygen Saturation (SpO2) were also recorded as sympathetic measures. It was expected that the predictions of the Bi-Hemispheric Model would be supported. A series of mixed design ANOVAs were used to analyze the data. Results revealed that both groups may have exhibited decreased auditory detection abilities in the ear contralateral to CVA location. Additionally, CVA patients recalled significantly more positive words, than negative or neutral words, and exhibited a significant learning curve. LCVA patients exhibited a recency effect, while RCVA patients exhibited a heightened primacy effect. Findings from HR and SPO2 measures suggested a parasympathetic response to neutral information as well as an impaired sympathetic response to negative information in RCVA patients. Taken together these results lend partial support to the hypotheses drawn from the Bi-Hemispheric Model of Emotion, as evidenced by the diametrically opposite effects in these groups, which appears to reflect opposing cerebral processes.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectBrain Asymmetryen_US
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
dc.subjectCerebrovascular Accidenten_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectEmotionen_US
dc.subjectDichotic Listeningen_US
dc.titleCerebral Laterality, Emotion, and Cardiopulmonary Functions: An Investigation of Left and Right CVA Patientsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHarrison, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Russell T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDenbow, Donald M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClum, George A.en_US


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