Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTrulove, Susanen_US
dc.coverage.spatialBlacksburg, Va.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-29T21:31:57Z
dc.date.available2015-10-29T21:31:57Z
dc.date.issued2008-11-10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/61494
dc.description.abstractFrom shells to bones, the skeletons of organisms contain small amounts of impurity elements such as magnesium. Because the levels of these elements provide important clues to past environments, a considerable effort has focused on understanding how to relate impurity contents to the ancient environments in which an organism lived.en_US
dc.format.mimetypetext/htmlen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Tech. University Relationsen_US
dc.rightsIn Copyright (InC)en_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s). For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectCollege of Scienceen_US
dc.titleBare bones of crystal growth: Biomolecules enhance metal contents in calciteen_US
dc.typePress releaseen_US
dc.rights.holderVirginia Tech. University Relationsen_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record