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dc.contributor.authorObilade, Titilola
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-01T23:49:24Z
dc.date.available2015-12-01T23:49:24Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/64259
dc.description.abstractThe students are undergraduate students from different continents and have contrasting interpretations of plagiarism. They have similarities in that they are all taking the class on plagiarism. They would need computers with internet connections. The learners are all students of journalism at Virginia Tech. However, they all have knowledge of vocabulary that is common to Virginia Tech. Words like hokie and hokie passport are peculiar to Virginia Tech. In the online class, they are all speaking their thoughts out loud through their reflections, the comments and feedbacks from the instructor and fellow students. They are familiar with the use of Scholar, the log-in process and the use of the hokie passport. They are given four case studies to analyze. In this way, their cognition is continuous through the use of repeated scenarios of plagiarism.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectConstructivismen_US
dc.subjectSituated learningen_US
dc.subjectPerceptions of plagiarismen_US
dc.subjectLearning modulesen_US
dc.titleSituated Learning as a Constructivist Learning Theoryen_US
dc.typeLearning objecten_US


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