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dc.contributor.authorBailey, Kyle Evanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-26T09:09:31Z
dc.date.available2015-12-26T09:09:31Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-08en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5355en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/64392
dc.description.abstractRio de Janeiro, Brazil is currently in the midst of extraordinary period of mega-event hosting. Central to the preparation and hosting of such mega-events are the issues of infrastructure and image. While a large number of articles have been keen to illustrate the transformative potential (and dilemmas) of utilizing mega-events to advance an urban agenda, less understood is role that citizen journalists and traditional media journalists play in the construction of the "media geography" of mega-events. This research examines the dominant narratives in the international media coverage of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil before the 2014 FIFA World Cup, specifically the 12 months leading up to that event starting with the 2013 Confederations Cup Riots. Data was derived from a content analysis of 5 western, international media outlets, as well as interviews with international and new media journalists from the New York Times, BBC, Wall Street Journal, Associated Press, Midia NINJA, and several other media organizations. These journalists were questioned about the dominant media narratives, as well as the role of new media, not only in reporting news on the ground in Rio de Janeiro, but also in how their presence helped shape the media's representation of Rio and perhaps construct a new "point of reference" for the city. The results of the quantitative and qualitative data suggest a couple of clear narratives. The first questioned whether or not the event's infrastructure projects would be ready in time for the start of the games. The second focused on reporting of the protests in Rio de Janeiro and elsewhere, attempting to give meaning to protests and the array of grievances that sparked those demonstrations. Additionally, this research examined how traditional and new media journalists leveraged social media to mobilize and facilitate the various contestations of Rio de Janeiro's mega-events.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectMega-Eventsen_US
dc.subjectMediaen_US
dc.titleThe Road to Rio: Infrastructure, Image, and New Mediaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeographyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairOliver, Robert Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGaffney, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKolivras, Korine N.en_US


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