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dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Center for Leadership in Global Sustainabilityen_US
dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Department of Geographyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStern, Marc J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBaird, Timothy D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-16T08:03:31Z
dc.date.available2016-02-16T08:03:31Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationStern, M. J., and T. Baird. 2015. Trust ecology and the resilience of natural resource management institutions. Ecology and Society 20(2): 14.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1708-3087
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/64831
dc.description.abstractThe resilience of natural resource management (NRM) institutions are largely contingent on the capacities of the people and organizations within those institutions to learn, innovate, and adapt, both individually and collectively. These capacities may be powerfully constrained or catalyzed by the nature of the relationships between the various entities involved. Trust, in particular, has been identified repeatedly as a key component of institutional relationships that supports adaptive governance and successful NRM outcomes. We apply an ecological lens to a pre-existing framework to examine how different types of trust may interact to drive institutional resilience in NRM contexts. We present the broad contours of what we term “trust ecology,” describing a conceptual framework in which higher degrees of diversity of trust, as conceptualized through richness and evenness of four types of trust (dispositional, rational, affinitive, and systems based), enhance both the efficacy and resilience of NRM institutions. We describe the usefulness and some limitations of this framework based on several case studies from our own research and discuss the framework's implications for both future research and designing more resilient governance arrangements.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Agricultural Experiment Stationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Food and Agriculture. Program McIntire Stennisen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech. Open Access Subvention Funden_US
dc.format.extent11 p.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Resilience Allianceen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/*
dc.subjectAdaptive governanceen_US
dc.subjectFunctional redundancyen_US
dc.subjectInstitutional resilienceen_US
dc.subjectNatural resource managementen_US
dc.subjectTrusten_US
dc.titleTrust ecology and the resilience of natural resource management institutionsen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.rights.holderStern, Marc J.en_US
dc.rights.holderBaird, Timothy D.en_US
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol20/iss2/art14/
dc.date.accessed2016-02-12
dc.title.serialEcology and Societyen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.5751/ES-07248-200214
dc.identifier.volume20
dc.identifier.issue2
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)