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dc.contributor.authorWang, Qien_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, John E.en_US
dc.contributor.editorBraunstein, Lidia Adrianaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-23T17:00:03Z
dc.date.available2016-03-23T17:00:03Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-28
dc.identifier.citationWang Q, Taylor JE. (2016). Patterns and Limitations of Urban Human Mobility Resilience under the Influence of Multiple Types of Natural Disaster. PLoS ONE 11(1): e0147299. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0147299en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.otherGrant No. 1142379en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/64978
dc.description.abstractNatural disasters pose serious threats to large urban areas, therefore understanding and predicting human movements is critical for evaluating a population’s vulnerability and resilience and developing plans for disaster evacuation, response and relief. However, only limited research has been conducted into the effect of natural disasters on human mobility. This study examines how natural disasters influence human mobility patterns in urban populations using individuals’ movement data collected from Twitter. We selected fifteen destructive cases across five types of natural disaster and analyzed the human movement data before, during, and after each event, comparing the perturbed and steady state movement data. The results suggest that the power-law can describe human mobility in most cases and that human mobility patterns observed in steady states are often correlated with those in perturbed states, highlighting their inherent resilience. However, the quantitative analysis shows that this resilience has its limits and can fail in more powerful natural disasters. The findings from this study will deepen our understanding of the interaction between urban dwellers and civil infrastructure, improve our ability to predict human movement patterns during natural disasters, and facilitate contingency planning by policymakers.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech BioBuild Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Programen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.88354en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights© 2016 Wang, Taylor. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectHuman mobilityen_US
dc.subjectNatural disastersen_US
dc.subjectTwitteren_US
dc.subjectUrban areasen_US
dc.subjectCell phonesen_US
dc.subjectTelecommunicationsen_US
dc.subjectWildfiresen_US
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.titlePatterns and Limitations of Urban Human Mobility Resilience under the Influence of Multiple Types of Natural Disasteren_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.rights.holderWang, Qien_US
dc.rights.holderTaylor, John E.en_US
dc.description.notesGeotagged positional data are available from Dryad with the following DOI: doi:10.5061/dryad.88354.en_US
dc.description.notes2015-2016 Open Access Subvention Funden_US
dc.title.serialPLOS Oneen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0147299
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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Attribution 3.0 United States
License: Attribution 3.0 United States