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dc.contributor.authorCourtney, C.
dc.contributor.authorWhite, A.
dc.coverage.spatialThe Philippines
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T18:55:20Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T18:55:20Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier685
dc.identifier.citationCoastal Management 28(1): 39-53
dc.identifier.issn0892-0753
dc.identifier.issn1521-0421
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/65817
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractWith fisheries declining, coral reefs battered, mangrove forests under threat, pollution levels rising, and coastal communities experiencing increased poverty, the Philippines faces severe challenges in managing its coastal resources. Coastal management efforts began in the Philippines more than 20 years ago through various community-based projects. Now, integrated coastal management is expanding in the country and holds the potential to reverse the trends. This article analyzes the situation in relation to new approaches for coastal management being undertaken through the Coastal Resource Management Project supported by the United States Agency for International Development implemented by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. This project, drawing on the lessons generated by past and ongoing coastal management initiatives, is emphasizing integrated approaches to management over narrowly focused fisheries management and habitat protection efforts. It highlights the increasingly important role of local governments and the changing roles of national government to effectively support integrated coastal management. Multisectoral collaboration is explained as standard procedure to achieve outcomes that are broad based and sustainable. Local and national level activities are contrasted and shown as essential complements in building institutionalization of resources management within all levels of government. A practical result framework is explained for measuring relative success at the local government level of implementing best practices for coastal management. Finally, lessons being learned related to collaboration, level of focus, education, and communication; who is responsible; and expansion of the project are highlighted.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherLondon, UK: Taylor & Francis Ltd
dc.rightsCopyright 2000 by Taylor & Francis Group
dc.subjectParticipatory processes
dc.subjectEcosystem management
dc.subjectEcosystem
dc.subjectMarine aquaculture
dc.subjectAquatic ecosystems
dc.subjectConservation
dc.subjectSustainability
dc.subjectNatural resource management
dc.subjectAquaculture
dc.subjectCollaboration
dc.subjectManagement
dc.subjectIntegrated
dc.subjectCoastal management
dc.subjectThe Philippines
dc.subjectEcosystem Governance Watershed
dc.titleIntegrated coastal management in the Philippines: Testing new paradigms
dc.typeAbstract
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/089207500263639
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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