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dc.contributor.authorAstone, J.
dc.coverage.spatialGuinea
dc.coverage.spatialWest Africa
dc.coverage.temporal1987 - 1993
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T18:56:00Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T18:56:00Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier1335
dc.identifier.citationWorld Development 26(9): 1773-1784
dc.identifier.issn0305-750X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/66044
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractInternational development planners need to incorporate rural people's extensive historical experience with colonial, state and international development projects into their project feasibility documents. A comparison of four planning documents prepared in Guinea during 1987-93 with historically informed field research demonstrates how the documents overlooked important factors in understanding local techniques in soil management and in women's organizational experiences. While many projects employ participatory methodologies to gather background information, they continue to emphasize technical and descriptive data and overlook important historical changes in the social and economic conditions that affect natural resource management strategies.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Science Ltd
dc.rightsCopyright 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.
dc.subjectRural development
dc.subjectWomen
dc.subjectSoil conservation
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectCommunity participation
dc.subjectCollective action
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectDevelopment planning
dc.subjectDevelopment programs
dc.subjectEvaluations
dc.subjectGrassroots organizations
dc.subjectColonialism
dc.titleIncorporating local history into planning documents: A case study from Guinea, West Africa
dc.typeAbstract
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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