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dc.contributor.authorDillaha, Theo A. IIIen
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Burton Blakeen
dc.contributor.authorMostaghimi, Saieden
dc.contributor.authorHeatwole, Conrad D.en
dc.contributor.authorShanholtz, Vernon O.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T18:56:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T18:56:03Zen
dc.date.issued1988en
dc.identifier1359en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Soil and Water Conservation 43(4): 288-290en
dc.identifier.issn0022-4561en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/66067en
dc.descriptionMetadata only recorden
dc.description.abstractRainfall simulators are ideal educational tools for demonstrating what agricultural non-point source pollution is and how it can be controlled. The simulators are effective because they allow controlled rainstorms to be applied to various cover plots when and where desired. Educational activities can be scheduled to coincide with artificial rainfall events, and the actual processes affecting erosion and pollutant transport can be observed and discussed. This, of course, is not practical with natural rainfall.en
dc.format.mimetypetext/plainen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectConservationen
dc.subjectRainfall simulationen
dc.subjectSoil conservationen
dc.subjectFarm/Enterprise Scaleen
dc.titleRainfall simulation: A tool for best management practice educationen
dc.typeAbstracten
dc.rights.holderCopyright 1988 Soil and Water Conservatin Societyen
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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