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dc.contributor.authorMeyer, C.A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T19:10:29Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T19:10:29Z
dc.date.issued1996
dc.identifier1496
dc.identifier.citationDevelopment and Change 27(3): 453-474
dc.identifier.issn0012-155X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/66295
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractNGO's are linked to environmental objectives for good reason: non-profit NGO's provide a flexible, private-sector answer to the provision of international environmental public goods. The non-profit sector can link for profit, non-profit, and public-sector objectives in complex contracts. This article examines how, for the case of the National Biodiversity Institute (INBio) in Costa Rica, such complex contracts with both domestic and international parties provide partial solutions to public goods problems in the absence of private property rights over genetic resources. INBio's 'monopoly' position, legitimized by the local government, brings in rents from genetic resources which are reinvested in the production of public goods.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford, UK: Blackwell Publisher
dc.rightsCopyright 1996 Institute of Social Studies
dc.subjectBiodiversity
dc.subjectNongovernmental organizations (NGOs)
dc.subjectInstitutions
dc.subjectNon-profit organizations
dc.subjectProperty rights
dc.subjectCosta Rica
dc.subjectPublic goods
dc.subjectEcosystem
dc.titleNGO's and environmental public goods
dc.typeAbstract
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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