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dc.contributor.authorPimbert, M.P.
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T19:19:01Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T19:19:01Z
dc.date.issued1991
dc.identifier2244
dc.identifier.citationIIED Gatekeeper Series No. SA29
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-84369-335-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/66746
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractPests have plagued agriculture ever since people began domesticating plants and animals. Over the centuries, farmers have developed a wide range of methods to combat these pests, but with varying degrees of success. In the 20th century, however, the introduction of commercial pesticides revolutionised pest control. These modern pesticides have helped to control and reduce crop and livestock losses to a remarkable degree. The use of these pesticides has, however, created some of today's major environmental and health problems: reduction in the abundance of diversity of wildlife, human health hazards associated with acute or chronic exposure to dangerous products in the workplace, and contaminated air, food and water.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherLondon, UK: International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
dc.relation.urihttp://www.iied.org/pubs/pdf/full/6043IIED.pdf
dc.rightsCopyright 1991 IIED
dc.subjectPesticide poisoning
dc.subjectPest management
dc.subjectBiodiversity
dc.subjectCultural pest control
dc.subjectHost plant resistance
dc.subjectIntegrated pest management (ipm)
dc.subjectField Scale
dc.titleDesigning integrated pest management for sustainable and productive futures
dc.typeAbstract
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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