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dc.contributor.authorBayon, R.en
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Kingdomen
dc.coverage.spatialEuropean Unionen
dc.coverage.temporal1990en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T19:19:23Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T19:19:23Zen
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifier2358en
dc.identifier.citationPrepared for the Katoomba Group Meeting in Locarno, Switzerland, Fall 2003en
dc.identifier.other2358_Bayon2004_make_enviro_markets_work.pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/66848en
dc.description.abstractEver since the passage of the 1990 amendments to the US Clean Air act and the creation of a market in sulfur dioxide (SO2), it has become clear that market mechanisms can be effectively used to achieve environmental policies. But markets are neither infallible nor automatic. They have blind spots and they need to be designed effectively if they are to effectively achieve environmental ends. This paper defines markets as regular gatherings of people for the purpose of buying and selling goods or services. Such markets are distinguished from public payments to private landowners for ecosystem services, or private deals between a few buyers and sellers. It then provides a brief overview of several existing and proposed environmental markets, including: the Acid Rain market in the US, the Emissions Trading Scheme in the UK, the proposed Emissions Trading System for the European Union, the US market in greenhouse gases proposed by Senators McCain and Lieberman, the US market in wetlands mitigation credits, and the renewable energy market in Texas. From these the paper attempts to draw some lessons and conclusions.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWashington, D.C.: Forest Trendsen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.forest-trends.org/documents/publications/Environmental%20Markets_R%20Bayon_final.pdfen
dc.rightsCopyright 2004 Forest Trends. Reproduction permitted with attribution.en
dc.subjectAir purificationen
dc.subjectMarketing and tradeen
dc.subjectLocal marketsen
dc.subjectWorld marketsen
dc.subjectPayments for environmental servicesen
dc.subjectInternational tradeen
dc.subjectGovernment policyen
dc.subjectWetlanden
dc.subjectEnvironmental servicesen
dc.subjectGovernment institutionsen
dc.subjectClimate controlen
dc.subjectMarketsen
dc.subjectPollution controlen
dc.subjectEnvironmental lawen
dc.subjectUS Clean Air Acten
dc.subjectSulfur dioxide (SO2)en
dc.subjectMarket mechanismsen
dc.subjectEmissions tradingen
dc.subjectMitigation creditsen
dc.subjectProperty rightsen
dc.subjectGovernment institutionsen
dc.subjectUs acid rain marketen
dc.subjectEnvironmental externalitiesen
dc.subjectCarbon dioxide (CO2)en
dc.subjectGreenhouse gasesen
dc.subjectKyoto Protocolen
dc.subjectThe uk emissions trading scheme (ets)en
dc.subjectThe chicago climate exchange (ccx)en
dc.subjectDamage mitigationen
dc.subjectGovernanceen
dc.titleMaking environmental markets work: Lessons from early experience with sulfur, carbon, wetlands, and other related marketsen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.description.notesPES-1 (Payments for Environmental Services Associate Award)en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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