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dc.contributor.authorElkhalifa, M.Y.
dc.coverage.spatialSudan
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T19:30:45Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T19:30:45Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier3156
dc.identifier.citationSustainable Development Department, FAO Regional Office for the Near East
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/67305
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractThis paper lists the many plants grown in Sudan for medical, culinary, and for aromatic purposes. In Sudan more than 80 percent of women work in rural areas work in agricultural activities and are the major cleavers of the trees. Women sell their surplus in markets. Women's tasks and involvement in agriculture varies according to regions. Indigenous knowledge reveals a large range of techniques and practices used for medical, culinary, and aromatic (MCA) use. Due to natural, political, and social disasters many women are now head of household. Wages in the MCA plants cultivation is very low. It is either paid on a daily or seasonal basis. Vendors lack information on market demands.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRome, Italy: FAO
dc.relation.urihttp://www.fao.org/sd/2003/PE12023a_en.htm
dc.subjectIncome generation
dc.subjectWomen
dc.subjectIndigenous community
dc.subjectMarkets
dc.subjectLocal knowledge
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectMedicinal plants
dc.subjectCulinary plants
dc.subjectAromatic plants
dc.subjectIndigenous knowledge
dc.titleWomen and income generating activities and conservation of natural resources: Medicinal, culinary and aromatic plants in the Sudan
dc.typeAbstract
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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