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dc.contributor.authorHuggins, D. R.en
dc.contributor.authorReganold, J. P.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T19:46:11Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T19:46:11Zen
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier4161en
dc.identifier.citationScientific American Magazine July 2008: 70-77en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68414en
dc.descriptionMetadata only recorden
dc.description.abstractSoil tillage is a primary cause of soil degradation, a worldwide agricultural and environmental crisis. No-till farming gives farmers a soil-protecting alternative to conventional tillage systems. Leaving crop residues in the field minimizes soil erosion, increases water infiltration (thus decreasing pollution from runoff) and improves soil quality, as well as providing numerous other direct and indirect benefits. Major barriers to adoption of no-till farming practices are the costs of specialized equipment and herbicides and the prerequisite knowledge required to implement a no-till farming system.en
dc.format.mimetypetext/plainen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherScientific American, Inc.en
dc.relation.urihttp://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=no-tillen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectConservation agricultureen
dc.subjectSoil degradationen
dc.subjectSoil conservationen
dc.subjectSoil managementen
dc.subjectSoilen
dc.subjectConservation tillageen
dc.subjectFarming systemsen
dc.subjectNo-tillen
dc.subjectCrop residuesen
dc.subjectEcosystem Field Scaleen
dc.titleNo-Till: How farmers are saving the soil by parking their plowsen
dc.title.alternativeNo-Till: The quiet revolutionen
dc.typeAbstracten
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2008 Scientific American, Inc.en
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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