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dc.contributor.authorHepperly, P.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T19:46:32Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T19:46:32Zen
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier4268en
dc.identifier.citationPresented at the International Meeting of the Soil and Water Conservation Society, Dearborn, MI, 13 July 2009en
dc.identifier.other4268_2009SWCSHepperlySoil.pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68506en
dc.description.abstractThe implementation of conservation agriculture can beneficially add to the soil's organic matter, decrease erosion, and increase the soil's water holding capacity. A substantial increase in carbon and nitrogen in the soil is also experienced. Ecological regeneration is another positive impact of conservation agriculture since it cleans waterways, improves water dynamics, helps avoid droughts, improves food quality and increases adaptability to climate change.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherBlacksburg, VA: Virginia Tech, Office of International Research, Education, and Development (OIRED)en
dc.relation.urihttp://www.oired.vt.edu/sanremcrsp/Meetings/SWCSSymposium.phpen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectConservation agricultureen
dc.subjectSoil degradationen
dc.subjectSoil conservationen
dc.subjectSoil fertilityen
dc.subjectSoil qualityen
dc.subjectSoil organic matteren
dc.subjectErosionen
dc.subjectMycorrhizal fungien
dc.subjectNo-till roller crimperen
dc.subjectRiver restoration,en
dc.subjectEcosystemen
dc.titleConservation agriculture and soil qualityen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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