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dc.contributor.authorRoose, E.en
dc.contributor.authorBarthès, Bernard G.en
dc.coverage.spatialRwandaen
dc.coverage.spatialCameroonen
dc.coverage.spatialBurkina Fasoen
dc.coverage.spatialBurundien
dc.coverage.spatialAfricaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:07:15Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:07:15Zen
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier4451en
dc.identifier.citationNutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 61: 159-170en
dc.identifier.issn1385-1314en
dc.identifier.issn1573-0867en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68754en
dc.descriptionMetadata only recorden
dc.description.abstractThis paper reviews and synthesizes studies on the effects of erosion on grain crop productivity in Rwanda, Cameroon, Burkina Faso and Burundi. While soil conservation practices are effective in reducing soil erosion, these strategies alone are often insufficient for boosting yields due to nutrient deficiencies. In Rwanda hedges substantially reduced erosion (less than 2 t ha(-1) y(-1) compared to 250 t for traditional cropping systems and 500 t for bare fallow). However, because of insufficient soil P, there were no increases in yields without mineral fertilizer. Likewise, in Nigeria a living hedge treatment showed very low run-off and erosion rates, but N fertilization was needed to see any increase in productivity. On a banana plantation in Burundi, both tree canopy and mulch cover reduced erosion. Full mulching showed the greatest decrease in erosion and also maintained good water infiltration. Once the soil was eroded, it could not be restored to its original productivity and character, even with the addition of amendments. Field trials in Cameroon revealed an increase in erosion corresponding to an increase in tillage intensity. Grass mulch effectively decreased erosion and run-off.en
dc.format.mimetypetext/plainen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishersen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectConservation agricultureen
dc.subjectSoil erosionen
dc.subjectConservationen
dc.subjectConservation tillageen
dc.subjectSoil organic matteren
dc.subjectFertilizationen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectCarbon lossesen
dc.subjectConservationen
dc.subjectErosionen
dc.subjectFertilizersen
dc.subjectHedgesen
dc.subjectLegumesen
dc.subjectManureen
dc.subjectMulchen
dc.subjectOrganic matter managementen
dc.subjectRestoration of soil productivityen
dc.subjectTillageen
dc.subjectField Scaleen
dc.titleOrganic matter management for soil conservation and productivity restoration in Africa: A contribution from Francophone researchen
dc.typeAbstracten
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishersen
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1023/A:1013349731671en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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