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dc.contributor.authorGiller, K.
dc.contributor.authorWitter, E.
dc.contributor.authorCorbeels, Marc
dc.contributor.authorTittonell, P.
dc.coverage.spatialSub-Saharan Africa
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:07:28Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:07:28Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier4297
dc.identifier.citationField Crops Research 114(1): 23-24
dc.identifier.issn0378-4290
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68809
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractThis paper critically analyzes the claims of successful conservation agriculture adoption (CA). CA is said to increase yields, to reduce labor requirements, improve soil fertility and reduce erosion. Yet, according to the authors the empirical evidence is not clear and consistent on many of those points. In sub-Saharan Africa the available evidence suggests virtually no uptake of CA. The authors conclude with a need for critical assessment of the ecological and socio-economic conditions for which CA is best suited.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier B.V.
dc.rightsCopyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectCarbon sequestration
dc.subjectSoil conservation
dc.subjectConservation agriculture
dc.subjectAdoption of innovations
dc.subjectSoil quality
dc.subjectSub-Saharan Africa
dc.subjectNo-till
dc.subjectZero tillage
dc.subjectCrop residues
dc.subjectMulch
dc.subjectSoil carbon
dc.subjectFarm/Enterprise Scale
dc.titleConservation agriculture and smallholder farming in Africa: The heretics' view
dc.typeAbstract
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fcr.2009.06.017
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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