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dc.contributor.authorOsbahr, H.en
dc.contributor.authorAllan, C.en
dc.coverage.spatialNigeren
dc.coverage.spatialWest Africaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:07:45Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:07:45Zen
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier4304en
dc.identifier4791en
dc.identifier.citationGeoderma 111(3): 457-479en
dc.identifier.issn0016-7061en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68886en
dc.descriptionMetadata only recorden
dc.description.abstractFarmers in Niger are faced with low-fertility, sandy soils, variable rainfall, changing social and political situations and an unfavourable economic environment. Not much is known about the specific details of farmers' physical and biological knowledge and how this impacts their management decisions. Based on research in Fandou Béri village, this article suggests a need to maximize the benefits of indigenous knowledge by integrating social and natural science.en
dc.format.mimetypetext/plainen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherAmsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier B.V.en
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectLocal knowledgeen
dc.subjectIndigenous communityen
dc.subjectLivestocken
dc.subjectSoil fertilityen
dc.subjectCommunity participationen
dc.subjectIndigenous knowledgeen
dc.subjectNigeren
dc.subjectWest Africaen
dc.subjectEthnopedologyen
dc.subjectFarm/Enterprise Scale Field Scaleen
dc.titleIndigenous knowledge of soil fertility management in southwest Nigeren
dc.typeAbstracten
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/S0016-7061(02)00277-Xen
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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